Content: Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Background: White Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Pattern: Blank Waves Notes Sharp Wood Rockface Leather Honey Vertical Triangles
Welcome to Fitnessandlifestyle.co.uk Fitness Forums

Welcome to Fitnessandlifestyle.co.uk - Fitness forums and community. Discuss topics such as fitness, nutrition diet and lifestyle. You're currently viewing fitnessandlifestyle.co.uk as a guest. Members can communicate with members all over the world by starting new topics and posts in the forums so sign up now. Its free to register!

Tim

Machines or free weights

16 posts in this topic

Someone in the gym told me I shouldnt use free weights if I havnt been lifting long because they can cause injurys. Is he correct? Are machines better?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hes wrong. If your bulking you need to do free weights.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Tim

I'd say he was wrong, I use both free weights and machines.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well machines are much safer that is correct but they dont engage as many muscles as free weights do. i mean even world class bodybuilders use machines, but realy does depends on what the machiens are at your gym, are they modern ones? and which company make steh machines? if u tell me this then it would really help!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So should I use them both or one or the other. I really want to bulk up.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He does have a point. Free weights done incorrectly can be dangerous, so make sure you have a spotter and you have been shown haow to do it by a fitness instructor.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well first of all tim u have to creat a foundation! first i startedout on machine weights but then got more into it and now do mainly free weights and the odd machine!

ive got beginner workouts at home for every major part, just send me an email MulMhmm@aol.com and ill email them to you

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would actually use a mixture of both. Squats and deadlifts can be dangerous for a beginner, however bench and shoulder press can be safe with a spotter.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Id personally stick with free weights

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks I will try to use both.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why does everybody want to be overblown!? i will never understand. i mean people look good when theyve reached a certain level some go too far, i mean you see these men with huge muscles in information leaflets like *maximuscle*, a big arm and a fucking ugly/stupid face. dont they know they look awful!!!!!!!!!

i mean ive seen men in the gym look huge when they take it off they are nothing but fat twats, no defintion at all or anything

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stick with free weights , until you start using them you'll always be a begginer on them machines will not let your stabilising muscles to develop and this will hinder your progress when you do decide to use free weights, just be sure to get a competent instructor or P.T. to show you how to perform the exercises correctly with good form.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are benefits to using free weights especially because it involves using more muscles (your stabiliser muscles) at the same time as the muscle  which you are focusing on. Having said that machines can also be a great way to really isolate the muscles and to focus on one specific muscle. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In truth, all weight training is dangerous in some capacity. But then, so is crossing the road (you could get hit by a bus) or walking down a flight of stairs (you could trip and fall). 

The thing is, what is the risk versus the reward?

If there was no reason to cross the road other than to get to the other side (maybe that works for chickens) then the risk is insanely high in comparison because there is zero reward. If the woman/ man of your dreams is over there, you haven't seen them for years and have been desperate to find them and they are just about to get on a bus, assuming the road isn't Silverstone on race day or something, then the reward probably trumps the risk. 

So, everything in the gym SHOULD be about risk versus reward. 

Free-weight training has a high risk level IF you don't know what you are doing. But the rewards are pretty high. Interestingly, for most conventional moves, the higher risk exercises tend to have a higher reward, because they recruit more muscles (ie Squats & Deadlifts are riskier but higher reward than bicep curls or lat raises). 

Therefore, if you know how to perform the lifts and do so with good technique, then the reward is more than worth the risk. And so long as you don't go crazy (looking for PBs every time) and can therefore maintain that form to 95% perfect at all times, there is hardly any risk at all in relative terms. 

With Resistance Machines the learning curve is much lower. If you don't know what you are doing, you can , theoretically, still walk up to a machine, read the instructions (usually stuck on the machine) and get going almost instantly with reasonable form. Assuming we are talking about machines with fixed planes of movement (chest press, leg press, leg curl etc) then you are pushed into a seat or against a pad or something, meaning you are highly unlikely to twist the wrong way and cause an injury. But, because you don't have to stabalise (you are using leverage to do that for you) then your returns on the exercise are lessened. 

This is not so much the case with cable machines. So things like lat pulldowns (using a cable not levers), a seated row (again cable, no chest pad or levers) or cable crossovers, there is a bit more stabalisation required as the cable is free to move in all angles. Therefore, a better return, but not quite to the level of free-weights, but the risk is a lot less. 

However, that is just risk in the moment. 

If you use a freeweight machine that uses lever or fixed ranges of motion, there is a long term issue. These machines are generally set up for 'the average man' who doesn't exist. They have a plane of motion that is the average. But maybe your hips or shoulders or whatever, don't naturally move through that plane of motion. Now the machine is forcing you to do something that your body shouldn't really be doing. So yes, you are less likely to twist and hurt your back, but you are continually straining your joints. Perhaps very lightly, but if you continue to do it, you may end up with RSI or a damaged tendon or ligament etc. 

Suddenly that doesn't feel as safe and the risk has gone up. 

My advice is, if you don't have anyone to show you how to do the freeweight movements properly. Find a way to learn (videos, books, take a course of a workshop or something). If your gym is decent (alas few are) there will be someone there who knows what they are doing and can help you. Rather spend the time getting the foundations right and build up to the high rewards, than try to get quicker results with the easier equipment and then suffer in the long term (at which point, if you want to keep progressing you'll have to learn the moves anyway). But, maybe, alongside the bigger moves, that you are spending time learning, utilise more isolation movements (curls, lat and front raises, kickbacks etc), body-weight exercises (push ups, pull ups, lunges etc) and cable based exercises (lat pulldown, seated rows, cable flyes, cable split squats etc) and build up your toolbox of exercises until you have a big enough range to choose from that you can safely apply them to your specific goals in a more tailored programme. 

Hope that all makes sense. 

Good luck,

Mark. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

answers on this thread seem really ignorant. machines aren't just for beginners. often times the machines and cables can help target the muscle better than free weights can. free weights only have resistance in one direction and that's down to the floor because of gravity, whereas the direction of resistance on a machine can be in any direction, therefore machines can be more beneficial for certain exercises and movements. a down side to machines is that they restrict your form, which can be good! but everyone is different so my motion will be different from yours. for example, rich piana (rip) always said he preferred machines and cables because it really allowed him to target the muscle he was training and fill it up with blood, yes he was on roids, but regardless he had to be able to break the muscle down properly

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a nutshell use both but seek help from a trainer if needed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

About Fitnessandlifestyle.co.uk

Fitness and lifestyle community for all.